Suh

I had dinner tonight with one of the Detroit Lions’ scouts.  We had a nice conversation about the team, the recent draft, past players, his job, etc…  I appreciated his time and willingness to meet with me.

After that conversation, it got me thinking about how I am ready for football to start now.  I am also starting to miss Ndamukong Suh.  Say what you want about him….he’s had his share of cheap shoots and personal fouls.  But he is one of, if not the best defensive player in the NFL and now he won’t be on my Lions.  We had 5 great years with him, but he’s the type of player that should start and end his career with one team.  Plus off the field, he is very generous with his money donating to many charities. 

So now Miami will benefit from his talents and all I can do is wish he was still on the Lions team……  

Ndamukong Suh

Ndamukong Suh

Percussion Publishing

Percussion Publishing has asked me to be featured as one of their freelance artist for book authors. One of their authors (Kendall Smith) already selected one of my photos for his book's cover art. That book is called Vault 21-12 and will be released on June 4th. I'll share more on that later.  You can learn more about Percussion Publishing here:  http://www.percussionpublishing.com/services/

Percussion Publishing

Percussion Publishing

The write up about me on Percussion Publishing's website.

The write up about me on Percussion Publishing's website.

Sedona Hiking Path

Not much to say about this photo.  It is what it is!  What I can tell you is that I took this on our first day as we drove into Sedona Arizona.  Even before we got to the town of Sedona, we pulled off the road so I could capture this photo. 

Have a great week.

To purchase a print or view the entire gallery, click the photo above.

To purchase a print or view the entire gallery, click the photo above.

Hardware Store

Here is something a little different for you.  I don’t normally take close up photos of anything.  I prefer landscape and architecture photography.  But today I have a photo of these 100-year old part drawers in the hardware store within the W. A. Young & Sons Machine Shop and Foundry.  The hardware store is on the 2nd floor of this location and is very cool.  The store still has all the products in the drawers, in the cabinets and on the shelves.  Anyway, I liked the detail on these and the age….

To purchase a print or view the entire gallery, click the photo above.

To purchase a print or view the entire gallery, click the photo above.

Heinz Lofts

A few weeks ago, Brad and I conducted a photo walk around the Heinz Lofts.  This complex is in the Troy Hill area of Pittsburgh.  The Heinz Lofts consists of 5 H. J. Heinz Company buildings that were constructed from 1913 to 1927.  The buildings were converted into apartments about a decade ago.  Prior to the conversion, Heinz used them for the food processing plant.  

To purchase a print or view the entire gallery, click the photo above.

To purchase a print or view the entire gallery, click the photo above.

W. A. Young & Sons Machine Shop and Foundry

Yesterday I had the opportunity to photograph a 115-year-old piece of America.  Just south of our house is this old machine shop, foundry, wood shop, blacksmith shop and hardware store all in one building.  It closed in 1966 and sat untouched until 1985, when it was reopened as a heritage site.  Other then getting everything back into working order, everything has been left, as it was the day it closed.  There are thousands of tools, equipment, supplies, etc….still just sitting there.  Most of which is over 100 years old.  Cool stuff.

Here is some information from another website about this location.  I can't verify how accurate it is, but providing this to you here was the fastest way to get you the details. 

Today it is owned and operated by the Rivers of Steel National Heritage Area, the W.A. Young and Sons Machine Shop and Foundry is a prime example of America's industrial heritage.

William A. Young, owner and operator of the business built the Machine Shop in 1900 with lumber from the family farm.  In 1908, the shop expanded to include the foundry.  The other major change to the shop occurred in 1928 when it was electrified.  

All of the equipment dates from 1870 to 1920.  An intricate system of belts and pulleys throughout the shop runs 25 pieces of machinery, each independent of the other and fully operational powered by one motor.  The motor was originally a 12-horsepower steam engine which was followed by a 20-horsepower electric engine, and finally replace by a 20-horsepower gasoline engine.

Young was a master carpenter and crafted many of the patterns used by the foundry.  A special type of wood was used which could withstand changes in humidity without warping. Patterns for parts were made from sketches by clients and are on display along the foundry walls.  After some study of these sketches, Young would make the pattern and the finished product would be ready for pickup the next day.

Business for the shop came through repairs to the steamboats traveling the river, as Rices Landing, being almost centrally located between Fayette and Greene Counties, was the hub for commercial distribution in the county at that time.  Much work was done for the local mines and as an extension of the boiler trade, a hardware store was added.  The hardware store can still be seen, fully intact, on the second floor.  

Before the existence of gasoline filling stations, the shop would furnish motorists with gasoline, which eventually led to auto repairs and a grease pit in the foundry.

During its operation, a father and two sons of the Young family manned the shop, except during World War II when the workforce increased to 30 and included women.  

An apprentice in the shop was required to build his own toolbox and tools in order to pass his apprenticeship.

The foundry produced almost anything that can be cast in molten metal with the huge coke fired furnace, which still stands with an unburned pile of coke beside it.  The shop craftsmen worked on and made everything from bronze castings, pipe fittings, locomotive wheels, and even mouse traps.  A huge gear, probably crafted to accommodate a river lock, still hangs on the wall in the foundry.

The Machine Shop closed its doors in 1966.  After years of neglect and vandalism, it was saved through purchase by the Greene County Historical Society in 1985.  Immediate repairs and stabilization were undertaken by volunteers from the community and the facility opened to the public the following year.  

The Machine Shop has undergone thorough documentation by historical recording engineers under the auspices of the National Park Service and the Steel Heritage Task Force, and was placed on the National Register of Historical Places in 1998.  The site has undergone extensive stabilization with monies in part from the above two organizations and private donations.  

To purchase a print or view the entire gallery, click the photo above.

To purchase a print or view the entire gallery, click the photo above.

Red Hallway

On the 4th floor of the Seattle Central Library, the entire hallway is this bright red (floors, ceilings, walls, etc…).  Off this hallway are conference rooms, classrooms, and offices.  The red is a large contrast to the blues, metal, and glass that dominates the rest of the library.

To purchase a print or view the entire gallery, click the photo above.

To purchase a print or view the entire gallery, click the photo above.

Penn Brewery

A few weeks ago when Brad and I photographed the Heinz Lofts, we went across the street to take a look at Penn Brewery.  As you can see, I captured a photo I liked.  The Penn Brewery, also known as the Pennsylvania Brewing Company, is a brewery and restaurant in the Troy Hill neighborhood of Pittsburgh.  Tom Pastorius started the brewery in 1986.  This was the site of the former Eberhardt and Ober Brewery, which was founded in 1848.  

To purchase a print or view the entire gallery, click the photo above.

To purchase a print or view the entire gallery, click the photo above.

Seattle's Funky Library

Here is another shot of the Seattle Central Library.  I posted another photo of this building back in March.  You can see it here:

http://brook-ward.com/blog/2015/3/5/seattle-central-library

This building is so weird.  I don’t even know how to describe it.  When I looked it up later, the architect couldn’t even put a specific design style on this structure.  Maybe modern contemporary is the best way to describe it.  There are lots of funky angles, bright colors, unusual spaces.  Around every corner, the building design changes to the point that they don’t even go together.  So I felt like I was in a different building when I changed areas within the building, instead of one continuous building.  So my take on this building is that it fits the Seattle culture. 

I took this photo from the 4th floor balcony looking out at the building support structure and the diamond shaped glass exterior wall.  Like I said, funky!!!

If you ever get to Seattle, check this place out.  

To purchase a print or view the entire gallery, click the photo above.

To purchase a print or view the entire gallery, click the photo above.

Redwood Trees

I realize this isn’t a technically perfect photograph.  The “Pure-ist” would rip this photo apart and tell me all the problems with it.  But I don’t care.  There is something about this photo that just makes me happy.  I think it reminds me of the actual experience of standing there in Muir Woods National Park looking up at these huge, majestic trees.  It was so peaceful with the sun shining through……  Or maybe I’ve just been working too hard and my mind has turned to jello.  Regardless, I like it.

Smithfield United Church of Christ

Here is an oldie.  I took this picture a few years ago, but never posted it for you.  I don’t know why, because I really like it.  It just kept falling to the bottom of the list.  Anyway, I am sorry for the delay, but now you have it.  This is the Smithfield United Church of Christ in downtown Pittsburgh.  What’s cool about this is that the church is on the 2nd floor of the facility.  Once you get up there, you enter this wonderful hidden treasure.  

To purchase a print or view the entire gallery, click the photo above.

To purchase a print or view the entire gallery, click the photo above.

Barbados Post Sunset

So it is currently sunset time at my house in Pittsburgh while I type this.  So I think it is fitting that I post a sunset photo.  I selected this photo from Barbados.  I actually took this photo about ten minutes after sunset.  Just a wonderful spot to enjoy a sunset!  Don’t you agree?

To purchase a print or view the entire gallery, click the photo above.

To purchase a print or view the entire gallery, click the photo above.

US 279

This shot has been done by dozens, if not hundreds of Pittsburgh photographers.  Regardless, I wanted to capture my version of this popular spot.

This is taken from a pedestrian overpass that crosses 9 traffic lanes of US 279 looking back south towards the city.  The overpass has a chain link fence along the entire bridge, but someone (not me) cut holes in it just for photographers to take this picture without the fencing getting in the way.  Again, I’ll stress it wasn’t me.  The holes were already there when we showed up.  Below I included a behind the lens photo taken with my iPhone to show you our set up (my camera next to Brad’s camera).  The hole in the fence was small, so we had to work close to each other.

To purchase a print or view the entire gallery, click the photo above.

To purchase a print or view the entire gallery, click the photo above.

My camera on the left, Brad's on the right.  It was nice of someone to cut this hole for us.

My camera on the left, Brad's on the right.  It was nice of someone to cut this hole for us.

MLK & Washington Monument

It is almost time for my annual pilgrimage into Washington D.C. for the Baldrige Examiner training.  While I am there, I try to get into the city to photograph as much as possible.  That’s my plan this year as well, along with having dinner with my cousin Eric.  Should be fun.

This photo is from last year’s trip.  As you can tell, this is the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial with the Washington Monument in the background.  

To purchase a print or view the entire gallery, click the photo above.

To purchase a print or view the entire gallery, click the photo above.

Broken Arrow

During our Pink Jeep tour on the Broken Arrow trail near Sedona, we stopped at a spot called Chicken Point.  While we were there, I took this picture.  I have no idea if this mountain has a name.  I just liked the looks of it.  I hope you enjoy it as well.

To purchase a print or view the entire gallery, click the photo above.

To purchase a print or view the entire gallery, click the photo above.

Here is the behind the lens video:



Matthew

Tonight I have something different for you.  Outside of football, I almost never take people photos.  But earlier this week, the local modeling agency sent over their new talent….Matthew.  Matthew, his crew and I had a great time.  We had about an hour of Matthew’s valuable time and captured some great images of him while he vogued for us.  So here is Matthew….

Matthew

Matthew

Strip District Sunset

Last week I posted a different angle of this bridge from my photo walk with Dave and Brad.  As I mentioned in that post, we spent a long time on the bridge capturing it from different point of views and with different light as the evening transitioned to night.  This one is prior to sunset…standing in the middle of the road…

Here is the link to the other post I mentioned above: http://brook-ward.com/blog/2015/4/2/david-mccullough-bridge

To purchase a print or view the entire gallery, click the photo above.

To purchase a print or view the entire gallery, click the photo above.